Maryte Collard – Country – Emblems

Inspiration: over the years I traveled to many countries of the world, and made many quilts inspired by my travels. But there is one country that has a special place in my heart. I feel that I owe this country so much, I will never be able to give back enough for what this country gave to me.

Vytis  [‘vîːtɪs], the knight on horseback, is one of the oldest coats of arms of European countries. The first image of the charging knight depicted on the seal of the Grand Duke goes back to the 1366. The earliest coins featuring the knight come from the last quarter of the 14th century; the other side of these coins depicts the Columns of Gediminas (Gedimino Stulpai). Columns are one of the earliest symbols of this country.
These emblems were handed down through the generations and restored as the symbols of the country every time the country got independence from an aggressive  neighbor.

This is a stylized image of the Vytis that I must give credit to the unknown author.
The original Vytis on the coat of arms of the country wears a shield over his left shoulder with a golden double cross on it. The double cross has been accepted as a symbol of the country since 1388.
As my knight doesn’t wear a shield, I embroidered the double cross in the lower left corner, as well I embroidered Columns of Gediminas on the right lower corner.
There is much more history to tell you about the country and the emblems that represent it, but I try to keep it short.
Hope, you all guessed the name of the country? I haven’t mentioned it!

The off white rider and a horse are made of commercial batik, fused and zigzag stitched to the read background. The red piece of linen is hand applique to the unbleached linen background and hand stitched. Unbleached linen background is also hand stitched with linen yarn.

The double cross and Columns of Gediminas are hand embroidered.

The original coat of arms:

  1. Love the way you transformed all the symbols into this well done emblem. From my limited historic knowledge the most known Gedymin was from Lithuania but I may be wrong 🙂

  2. I have to admit I don’t know the country but I have deducted it for your origin. I like the stylization of the knight and all the hand-stitched, and the embroidery of the two symbols.

  3. Lovely work Maryte, what a great way to honour your country with your interpretation of the coat of arms. Beautifully stitched, a great piece, well done.

  4. I am looking forward to discovering more about your country through this challenge Maryte ! your interpretation of the coat of arms is beautiful , I love how you simplified the design to keep the essential.

  5. I have never commented on my quilt before but I must admit it was a big challenge for me to use linen fabrics. It looks even scarier for me thinking of how I am going to design next pieces. That is going to be the biggest challenge I’ve ever had.

  6. I’m assuming from previous comments that this is Lithuania? I’ve not visited there, but have seen this image in other countries. Your story is very touching and I am excited to learn more of this country. Stylizing the image was a smart move as it simplifies it yet keeps it recognizable. The handwork is very nice.

  7. Stunning, of course i would never has guessed, love your minimalistic approach and quilting.

  8. These simplified images from the Lithuanian coat of arms are so effective, as is the use of colour. Really stunning. Thanks for giving some of its history so we can all learn. Visiting your country is on my bucket list, corona willing I shall get there.

  9. For us Lithuania will always be intertwined with the start of Gied’s illness. But of the few days we spent in your country, we will always remind the unbelievable kindness and help of the people. I therefore hope, one day, to have the opportunity to get to know your country better and I love to learn more of the history and the beauty through your quilts. This one is a beautiful designed quilt with so much meaning and history all put together in a simplified, more abstract, coat of arms. The hand quilting really adds something special to it. Bravo.

  10. I love the way that you have simplified the coat of arms to create a stunning quilt. The motifs are beautifully worked as is the hand quilting. Like the others, I am looking forward to learning more about your country through your quilts and the very informative text you have included. Beatiful

  11. Your design is very striking because of its colour scheme. The knight seems more impressive in his simplified form and the whole is set of well by the lovely quilting.

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